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From goggle strap clips and removable visors to MIPS technology and enduro-specific lids, here's our top pick of the best helmets for mountain biking, that will keep your noggin safe whilst on the trials!

[part title="Bluegrass Golden Eyes helmet"]

bluegrass-golden-eye

An enduro-specific lid from Italian brand Bluegrass, the Golden Eyes helmet looks a little different from the norm. With a low back end to give maximum skull coverage and a large visor that’s easily adjusted to butt out the glare, the Golden Eyes is a welcome addition to the rack.

The hexagonal and triangular vents allow for plenty of air to pass through, and handy details such as a goggle strap clip at the rear and the appropriately sized hole for a headcam mount are nice touches.

PriceL £99.99, available from Bluegrass.

[part title="Bontrager Lithos"]

Lithos weiss

A high performing, lightweight helmet is just what any self-respecting hard-charging mountain biker needs, so make a path to the Lithos from Trek’s in-house component brand Bontrager.

Whether you’re charging at high speed or climbing a little slower, the cleverly designed ventilation will work whatever your speed and combined with the AgION fit pads that are moisture-wicking and antibacterial and the removable visor that has 10 degrees of tilt adjustment, you stay fresh all day.

Price: £79.99, available from Bontrager.

[part title="Scott Lin"]

Scott-Lin-Helm-MIPS-green-matt-S-d0e94949588c8298d7e63929237bbe5a (1)

A good-looking helmet can be hard to find, unless you make a beeline for the Scott Lin. And its beauty isn’t purely on the surface – it runs through the whole construction of the well-thought out lid.

With a meaty 18 vents and some deep internal channeling that beauty runs deep, but the real twinkle in the eye is with the inclusion of MIPS technology, a low friction layer that sits between the padding and the EPS liner which, upon impact, allows to the shell to rotate relative to your head, thereby reducing the force of the bump.

Being one of our best helmets for mountain biking, it’s technology that many other manufacturers charge a fair amount more for…

Price: £79.99, available from Scott.

giro-xar-helmet

The updated sibling to the much-loved Xen, the Xar from Giro is another rung on the popular helmet maker’s ladder to greatness.

With such outstanding design features as ample coverage without too bulky a profile, a single-handed fit system that adjusts the height at the back as well as the circumference, and removable X-Static pads to protect the liner from getting whiffy Giro’s reputation is in the bag.

And what seals the deal is the inclusion of Giro’s Roll Cage reinforcement for a superb feeling of safety.

Price: £119.99, available from Giro.

[part title="Fox Flux"]

large_flux1

The Flux from Fox goes deep, seriously deep at the back – its rear EPS profile gives some of the most comprehensive coverage to the back of the head that we’ve ever seen.

This swathe of lid is compensated for by 20 large vents covering the helmet, providing plenty of channels for the air to flow through. To really soup things up on the style front, the Flux not only has a visor it has a spoiler too, helping to channel the air flow and keep you streamlined.

Price: £70, available from Foxhead.

Best PriceL £55.99, Winstanley Bikes.

[part title="POC Trabec Race"]

poc-trabec-race-mips

If you’re looking for something a little different with your helmet, turn your attention to the inventive Swedish brand Poc and its Trabec Race helmet.

Combining functionality and performance for single track and enduro riders, the Trabec is a well-ventilated piece of quality design. A reinforced inner EPS core is tough and resilient and the outer shell has its seams in the least exposed areas.

Another helmet to include MIPS technology, the Trabec offers both superior protection and styling.

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