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Bike accessories and repair kits can be extremely expensive (especially if you have an old bike that breaks a lot) but don't worry, it's not always necessary to buy expensive top of the line tools or gear to improve your ride.

Find out what you can do with a can of deodorant, an old toothbrush and a roll of Sellotape by reading on - you might be surprised. We also think it might be worth checking out our 10 Bike Shops with a Difference for when things can't be fixed at home.

Read on to find out about our simple bike kit solutions essential for any cyclist...

latex gloves

The cheapest hand warmer on the market, you can get yourself a box of ten of these for £1.44 on Amazon.

On cold, wet days pop on a pair of these underneath your normal riding gloves to enjoy an extra layer of warmth and make your gloves doubly waterproof.

spoon

Who would have thought a spoon would act as simple bike kit solution?

People have been substituting specifically designed tyre levers for decades in favour of the handy kitchen spoon.

Next time you need to change an inner tube just grab yourself a table spoon to act as a lever and away you go.

deodorant

Carry a mini deodorant and roll of Sellotape with you when you're out cycling and then next time you get a punctured inner tube you will be all set to fix it in seconds.

Simply spray deodorant over the hole and then seal lightly with the tape. Pump up, and you're ready to go again.

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For those emergency days when the weather is miserable and you're desperate to go out on a ride but find yourself without any mudguards and the local bike shop is closed.

What do you do? Grab an old plastic folder from around the house, cut it up and fashion a makeshift mud-guard out of it. You could even buy a couple just in case, they're certainly cheaper than multiple mudguards.

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Next time you get a new credit card, don't cut the old one up and throw it away, instead cut it up and chuck it in your kit bag.

If you often take the wheels off your bike to transport it in your car, a cut in half and folded credit card is perfect for keeping the brake pads apart.

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You might not need a kit bag very often and so don't see the point in investing in a proper one. If that is the case then get yourself a cheap Ikea bag instead.

On the odd occasion that you find yourself needing a kit bag you will be able to use this and for the rest of the time it makes a great laundry bag too.

[part title="7. Parrafin"]

parrafin

Available from B&Q for £6.99 for four litres, Parafin is a much cheaper alternative to bicycle specific chain and cassette cleaners, but it does the job just as well and a container this big will last you a very long time.

109904

Some washing up liquids and household cleaners can be far too harsh to clean your bike using them. But Tesco's Daisy is gentle (and tough) enough to make for an amazingly cheap cleaner to get your bicycle sparkling again after a particularly muddy ride. And it costs just 59p for 500ml.

Digital Camera

There's nothing worse than parking your bike up in the sunshine and going back to it hours later to find the seat soaking wet after an unexpected downpour. You're then left having to pedal all the way home out of the saddle to stop yourself getting a soaking wet bum.

This is such a common problem and such an easy to solve one. Stash a couple of carrier bags at the bottom of your bag and whenever you have to leave your bike outside tie one round the saddle to stop it getting wet.

toothbrush

For cleaning small bike components like the cassette and chain, there really is no better tool than an old toothbrush. Of course you can buy specific bike-branded brushes for this job but there really is no point, the good old toothbrush will clean your chain up just as well.

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