Pinnacle is the in-house brand at Evans Cycles. The bikes are designed by James Olsen, who also worked on the retailer's HOY collection and before that he was the geometry and tubing genius behind Genesis bikes.

Olsen is yet to create a carbon bike - he's instead become a master of working with harder-wearing aluminium. A seasoned bike packing racer, Olsen appreciates a bike that's sturdy, reliable, and able to handle more varied terrain than is typical. Most Pinnacle bikes come with room for wider tyres, and all have eyelets for mudguards and panniers. Though there are road bikes, adventure road/cyclocross bikes and mountain bikes in the range - the hybrid bikes are some of the biggest sellers, perhaps thanks to their practicality and sturdy ride quality.

Bike Designer James Olsen Answers: Do Women Need Female Specific Bikes?

Not sure what style of bike to buy? A guide to bike styles here

All model families come with women's versions available - in most cases with a very slightly altered geometry, the key changes are in the touch points: handlebars, cranks and saddle.

Being an in-house brand for Evans Cycles, Pinnacle bikes are able to offer impressive spec for the money. But there's much more to them than being a 'good deal'. In recent years the brand has produced some intriguing new creations that genuinely show they're not just following trends: the Chronium and Lithium Ion being two examples.

The full range is pretty extensive, but here's a look at some of the most popular and interesting Pinnacle hybrid women's bikes for 2017...

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Pinnacle Chromium 2017 Womens Hybrid Bike

Pinnacle Chromium 2017 Womens Hybrid Bike

This is a bike that surprised us. It looks a little bit (a lot) like a traditional cruiser. That brings with it, if we're honest, expectations of riding something that feels like a lead weight and turns a full 360 degrees at the twitch of the handlebars. We've yet to ride one to test the handling, but lifting the bike from its stand it was surprisingly light for the style at a smidge over 11kg.

Described as a 'refined character of a bike' this fat tyred cruiser has been several years in the making. Wide 1.75" tyres aim to provide a smooth ride, whilst swept back handlebars should give control. Hydraulic disc brakes have been used and the bike comes specced with full mudguards. You really could take it off-of-the-road a bit if you wanted to. The twin top tube is a lovely nod to past styles, and helps to create a comfortable ride without hefty weight.

Pinnacle Chromium 2017 Womens Hybrid Bike

There are two models available - the Chromium 2 (pictured) with Shimano Sore groupset and Shimano M396 hydraulic discs, for £700 or the Chromium 1 (in blue) with a more mixed groupset and Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc Brakes for £550.

Pinnacle Lithium Ion 2017 Women's Electric Bike

Pinnacle Lithium Ion 2017 Women's Electric Bike

It's true - the E-bike is still a machine for the specialist market but this one is really very appealing. Tested over long, sometimes off-road rides, it's not just a city E-bike. With 50c tyres specced, it can fit 2.1" mountain bike tyres without mudguards so it can handle some rugged terrain as well as providing a gentle uplift on the hills.

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The Pinnacle Lithium-Ion can transport you up to 50 miles in one charge - and it uses a Shimano STEPS pedal assist system which delivers three power settings in a way that feels smooth as opposed to the jolting shock some E-bikes offer. The battery is easy to remove for charging and the system is also covered by Shimano's UK warranty department.

The bike does weigh 17.7kg - so it's no skinny creature and it won't be easy to carry up the stairs. That's the case with pretty much any E-bike and though reducing the weight is clearly what's needed to improve their popularity, it's going to take time.

At £1,800, the Pinnacle Lithium Ion is available with women's touch points in a size Small and Medium.

Pinnacle Lithium Ion 2017 Women's Electric Bike
Pinnacle Lithium Ion 2017 Women's Electric Bike

Pinnacle Lithium 2017 Women's Hybrid Bike

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The Pinnacle Lithium is a best seller. In fact, 45 per cent of all the women's hybrids sold across the brand belong to this family.

The Lithium is described as a 'do it all hybrid'. It's a bit like a rigid 29er mountain bike, mixed with a touring/city bike. A really ambitious mountain biker who felt talented enough to forgo suspension could take it down some proper trails. Your average rider could enjoy canal paths, parks and light forest riding whilst still feeling slick in the city.

There's space for 2.2" mountain bike tyres, though the bike comes specced with 38-42c rubber depending upon which model you opt for.

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There are three women's models available. First up is the the Pinnacle Lithium 3 (pictured) for £475 with Shimano Altus shifters and Shimano hydraulic discs plus 40c tyres. One model down is the Pinnacle Lithium 2 (in red) for £375 with Shimano Tourney shifters and derailliuers and Tektro v-brakes plus Continental Sport Contact II 42c tyres. Finally, there's the entry level Pinnacle Lithium 1 (black with blue details) for £300 with slightly less rugged Kenda K-West 38c tyres and v-brakes.

Pinnacle Neon 3 2017 Women's Hybrid Bike

Pinnacle Neon 3 2017 Women's Hybrid Bike

The hybrid for a rider who intends to dwell mostly on paved surfaces, with the odd foray into rougher stuff, is the Neon. It's a fast fitness ride sort of bike with a flat-handlebar, providing a comfortable position that'll create an easy ride though city streets.

For 2017 the top end Pinnacle Neon 3 (pictured) comes with hydraulic disc brakes, a Shimano Sora groupset and Kenda K-West Semi Slick tyres in a city ready 32c for £600. There's also the Pinnacle Neon 2, for £500 with Shimano Claris shifting and Tektro V-Brakes and the £400 Pinnacle Neon 1 with Shimano Acera.

Pinnacle Cobalt 2017 Women's Hybrid Bike

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Getting even closer to mountain bike territory, is the Pinnacle Cobalt. With large volume, multi-surface 700c tyres and a short travel 63mm suspension fork it can carry out a number of tasks.

The Suntour fork comes with a lockout, so you can switch off the excess bob for city riding, then switch it on if you want to tackle a few local roots and rocks off-road. This really is a 'Jack of All' trades sort of bike - but that also means it's a master of none. If you know you're more likely to spend all your time on the road (or all your time off the road) it might be worth looking to a different machine.

For 2017, there are two women's models - the Pinnacle Cobalt 2 (silver) for £500 with Shimano hydraulic discs, Shimano Atlus and Acera shifting, Suntour NRX DLO coil, 63mm travel fork with lockout and WTB Nano Comp tyres in 40c. There's also the Pinnacle Cobalt 1 (white) for £375 with a slightly lower end Suntour NEX HLO, 63mm travel fork with lockout, Shimano Tourney shifting and Tektro v-brakes. There is also a unisex/men's Pinnacle Cobalt 3 (pictured) for £650 with very similar geometry (a men's saddle/wider handlebars you might want to change), Shimano Alivio shifting, and Suntour NRX DLO Air sprung, 63mm travel fork with tapered steerer and hydraulic lockout.

Drop handlebars? There's always the Arkose and Dolomite...

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For those after something more road-bike-like, there is the Pinnacle Arkose 'adventure road' bike (£800-£1000). The model has had a few tweaks this year that take it closer to the cyclocross, off-road function from whence it initially came. Having ridden the 2015 version on a long term test, I'd wholly recommend the platform as a great off-roader. A little sluggish on the road for a racer, but suited to someone after a gentle ride.

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If you think you're moving into road bike territory proper - the Pinnacle Dolomite (£650 to £1150) is a safe and secure feeling ride with hydraulic discs on all but one model this year, wide tyres and bolt through axels on the front wheel for added stability.

Well - there's a look at the highlights from Pinnacle on 2017. If you're not entirely sure what style of bike you're looking for and want some guidance, check out this first bike buyers guide.