Are Speed Bumps Dangerous for Cyclists?

Cyclists petition against speed bumps in popular training park

Image: Richard Drdul


Plans to create a Cycle Superhighway in London’s Regent’s Park have been met by concern from cyclists who think the speed bumps designed to slow drivers down could be dangerous.

Transport for London want to link Brent Cross and the West End of the Outer Circle – a four-mile stretch popular for road cycling training rides – as part of the CS11 superhighway.

They intend to cut the number of cars by closing the gates for most of the day – but The Royal Parks are concerned without speed bumps remaining drivers will turn the area into a “race track”.

The humps would be paid for via TfL’s cycling budget and though cyclists are in favour of cutting the traffic, some are concerned that speed bumps will become dangerous for those who use the park for fast paced training rides.

Chairman of Regent’s Park Cyclists, Justin McKie, has set up a petition against the raised humps, which he calls “anti-cycling infrastructure”. He says that rather than add in speed humps, TfL simply need to close the gates of the park all day, or for more extended periods of time.

McKie told the Evening Standard: “There’s been a pretty strong consensus on what needs to happen: close the gates to motor traffic either all day or for extended periods, keep the wonderful smooth tarmac rather than falling for the knee-jerk of speed bumps, and re-sequence the traffic lights to encourage sports cyclists to ride at quieter times of the day.”

He added: “The Royal Parks has a unique opportunity to get some cash from the TfL cycling budget here, but anything that makes cycling more difficult or dangerous, such as speed bumps, would be a misuse of that money.”

The petition has been signed by over 1,600 people – and they have the support of athletes such as 2012 Olympic Triathlete Stuart Hayes, who has said: “Fingers crossed speed humps stay out of Regents Park, [it’s the] number one place to bike hard in central London.” At present, TFL and The Royal Parks will continue to work together on finalising their proposals.

Those opposing the speed humps are generally taking a view that they will ruin what is considered a ‘training ground’ for cyclists – and they would of course make life difficult for those seeking chaingang’s and the time trial efforts Sir Bradley Wiggins completed in the park prior to his Hour Attempt. Other suggestions for traffic calming have included speed cameras.

However, we wonder if those using their bikes to get from A to B in London might be keener to welcome the traffic slowing powers of raised bumps.

What do you think – are you against or in favour of speed bumps on popular cycling routes?


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